How many times have you found yourself searching a particular movie plot in Wikipedia? or asking your friends if they really got the movie or missed the point? There are literally examples where audiences completely missed the point in movies and still they have no idea what the makers were trying to say. Even when movies seem to be presented as simple, mindless humor, there is always some underlying messages waiting to be discovered. You may be intelligent enough to get the whole movie in one go but there are people out there who needs to read this article.

These are the movies where not only audiences missed the point but critics too. Have a look!

1. Fight Club

Norton plays the unnamed protagonist, referred to as the narrator, who is discontented with his white collar job. He forms a “fight club” with soap maker Tyler Durden, played by Pitt, and they are joined by men who also want to fight recreationally. When the film released, it became an instant cultural lodestone, prompting young groups of men to go out and try and start their very own underground fight clubs.

It would seem that these fans didn’t bother to stick around till the movie ending. From the starting, it’s very clear  that The Narrator is suffering. He’s a victim of a system that tells him to stick to the role he was given and, as a result, he becomes a prisoner to the traps of capitalism until he meets Tyler Durden.

It’s hard not to like Tyler. He’s cool, charismatic and free. But his anarchist creed that involves violence and causing mayhem wherever he goes, is not a healthy one. He is a madman fundamentalist who shoves The Narrator into an extreme world that is far worse than the one he found so numbing.  Rather than saying manliness is the escape from unending consumerism and a hum-drum life, Fight Club is really a cautionary tale about the dangers of toxic masculinity.

movies where audiences missed the point

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2. Dirty Dancing

Dirty Dancing will always be considered a classic movie, but it wasn’t very popular at the time of release. Test audiences hated it, critic Roger Ebert called it a, “…relentlessly predictable story of love between kids from different backgrounds.” But now the film is considered iconic with some calling it the greatest “chick flick” of all time.

The film is actually a rather autobiographical account of screenwriter Eleanor Bergstein’s life. Just like Baby, she came from a Jewish family who spent time in the Catskills and also participated in dancing competitions. It is really just a metaphor for Baby finally growing up and expressing her sexual freedom. Although not expressly said in the movie, but it happened in 1963 before the passing of Roe v. Wade. This forces Penny to have to get an abortion by back alley doctor. The film is a reminder of the dangers that can happen when women are not given the right to choose.

movies where audiences missed the point

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3. American Psycho

When American Psycho was released, it was criticized for promoting violence and critics said these movies shouldn’t be made in first place. The film is based on the novel of the same name, written by Brett Easton Ellis, but it wasn’t Ellis who ended up adapting the script. Instead director Mary Harron and Guinevere Turner took on the task. If there’s one thing that does really suck about this movie, it was unclear as to whether Patrick Bateman really did kill all those people, or if he imagined it all in his head. We totally missed the point in the movie and most of us are still unsure about the ending.

I hate ambiguous endings, so I had to stop and have a think about the different possibilities. So although this is open to discussion and debate (obviously) here are the three possibilities, One – Patrick killed absolutely no one, is totally insane and imagined the whole thing. Two – Patrick killed every single person we saw him murder, but no one believed him when he admitted to it. Three – Patrick killed everyone except for Paul Allen, as he had imagined killing Paul in his head.

The conclusion of the story really isn’t quite as clear in the movie as it is in the book, as in the book it is made quite apparent that yes, Bateman really did kill absolutely everyone.

movies where audiences missed the point

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4. Natural Born Killers

Natural Born Killers was again criticized for glorifying violence. The movie is based on an original screenplay by Quentin Tarantino, although the script was revised. It tells the tale of a modern-day Bonnie and Clyde who go on a murderous rampage in the hope of attracting the attention of the media and becoming famous.

The film follows the exploits of Mickey and Mallory, Stone is actually making a commentary on the media’s obsession with violence and how they love showing violence on screen, which is embodied by Robert Downey Jr.’s uproarious turn as an Australian TV show host. The controversy over the film managed to prove that the media gravitates to the very mention of violence knowing that audiences will rush to tune in.

movies where audiences missed the point

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